With evidence that the move to automate and enhance productivity has accelerated the already shifting set of skills required from colleagues, Robert Stark argues that the key skill-sets of the future will be relational and data-driven based but sees little generational differences between the existing workforce and the next gen’ers in terms of expectations.…human needs haven’t changed much, but those needs should be meet and that’s where technology come into play.

There is a huge amount of effort being put into automation by businesses at present, including real estate, which by conservative estimates will displace more than 20% of current manual tasks in the near future.

Economists at the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) are already demonstrating that those firms with early adoption of automation are actually counterintuitively increasing total employment rather than decreasing it. Whilst this is not software automation, we can reasonably assume a correlation at this stage, and our experience to date with our own automation programme suggests this holds true. Strategically, we are aiming for productivity, not simply efficiency – the difference being that efficiency is doing the same with less, but productivity is doing more with the same.

What that means is the move to automation has accelerated the already shifting set of skills we require from our colleagues.

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